Power-sipping silicon takes aim at the Internet of Things

Power-sipping silicon takes aim at the Internet of Things
New intelligence and connectivity promise to not only reduce the power load for today's smart products, but to bring previously isolated devices into the IoT fold.

New intelligence and connectivity promise to not only reduce the power load for today's smart products, but to bring previously isolated devices into the IoT fold.
According to zdnet ,The Internet of Things represents a massive expansion in the number of connected devices, but adding many of them to the network creates new challenges in terms of connected longevity, challenges that will require improving power consumption of many device components. A host of companies are wringing power consumption out of devices to the point where they can add intelligence and connectivity to products for which it has never been practical.
Morse Micro
W-Fi may have started out in the 2.4 GHz band, but its backers have been on a mission to extend it to wherever unlicensed spectrum can be found. Years after becoming entrenched in the 5 GHz range, the wireless standard is now rolling out in the 6 GHz bands. But not every move has achieved mass market penetration with Wi-Fi's 60 GHz implementation (formerly WiGig) having made limited progress.
Also: Developer burnout and a global chip shortage: The IoT is facing a perfect storm
Morse Micro is one of the companies seeking to expand Wi-Fi to another part of the spectrum with Wi-Fi HaLow. Published by the Wi-Fi Alliance in 2017, Wi-Fi HaLow (aka 802.11ah) brings the standard to the 800 and 900 MHz bands. This can provide long range that extends well beyond the boundaries of a home, albeit at much slower speeds better suited to audio than 4K video transmission.
Bluetooth is already one of the more power-efficient standards in general use and is being tuned to sip even less juice with Bluetooth LE. But Wiliot has reached the Bluetooth efficiency endgame by eliminating the need for a battery altogether. Its sticker-mounted transmitters keep bits flowing by "harvesting" ambient radio signals in its immediate vicinity. The company is now shipping the second generation of its technology, with main applications including inventory tracking, where it competes with RFID, and relaying prescription information from a pill bottle label. Wiliot also sees its technology powering smart clothing in the future.

May 30, 2021 09:52

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